Welcome

Put yourself into your work and your work will make friends.

-JK

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For the things we have to learn before we can do them, we learn by doing them.

-Aristotle

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Practise what you know, and it will help to make clear what now you do not know.

Rembrandt

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Appreciation of beauty is not a matter of judgement but of response.
-Pye

-Tolstoy

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If you do not expect the unexpected you will not find it.

—Wendell Castle

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Art is not a handicraft, it is the transmission of feeling the artist has experienced.

-Tolstoy

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The hand is the tool of tools.

-Aristotle

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After learning the tricks of the trade don’t think you know the trade.

—Wendell Castle

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Furniture is mute, but continually communicates its presence.

—Glenn Gordon

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I paint objects as I think them, not as I see them.

-Picasso

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Take time to discover the subtleties.

—James Krenov

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… attention is our most important tool in the task of improving the quality of our experience.

-Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

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If you hit the bulls-eye every time you are too near.

—Wendell Castle

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The beautiful is that which is desirable in itself.

-Aristotle

-Aristotle

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Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life.

Picasso

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…both the experience of the work and the result will be different each time.

—James Krenov

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Without deviations from the norm progress is not possible.

-Frank Zappa

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Difficulties mastered are opportunities won.

-Churchill

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Those of us who want to do what we really care about need never to be bored doing it.

-James Krenov

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Featured Item Text
Zebra Wood Pantry Doors


Being an interior decorator, our client has impeccable taste in contemporary stylings. She requested that I use white glass in a section of her commissioned sliding doors, the rest was up to me. We just happened to have some nice Zebra wood veneer in the shop looking for a good home. I thought it would do nicely…


Local Handmade Custom Furniture with Heart

Shipping:
Commissioning custom furniture outside Florida is not a problem. I ship my fine studio furniture all over the country. My work is sold in galleries in Seattle, WA, Santa Fe, NM, and Mendocino, CA. The individual furniture piece will dictate how it should be shipped; for instance, a large dining room table may be blanket-wrapped and sent specialty furniture mover or crated and shipped freight. On the other hand, a small cigar, jewelry box, or carving may be crated and shipped fedex. Custom kitchen cabinets can be brought in a box truck. Anything is possible, please inquire.

  


Parties

That’s right, parties. We have them a couple of times a year at the shop, and we would like for you to come. We usually have them during the downtown Gainesville Artwalk, and they are open to everyone. We often have a nice hardwood, scrap-fueled fire, stiff sangria, fine custom wood furniture from local makers, and little kids running around like crazy. If you would like to be notified, sign by hitting the join me tab or send me a note on the contact page. You will get an email occasionally whenever I finish furniture pieces and update the website with photos.

  


Commissioning Custom Work

When I begin a new commission, I like to meet with the client to discuss the project. At this meeting I am gathering the clues and inferences that will lead to ideas and possibilities. Sketches and pictures you have collected can be helpful. We can look at wood samples and pictures of other projects, no matter how extraordinary or ordinary. We can discuss your hopes, dreams and necessities.

Dimensions are important. If we are designing a display cabinet for an object, I will need to get careful measurements of the object, and I may take pictures for reference. For a dining set, the room size is important, as is the number of diners to be accommodated. While I design and produce the finished piece, I like to think of a commission as a collaboration, which reflects the unique character of the client.

At the end of this meeting, if we are to proceed, I will ask for a design fee. This fee could be between two to five hundred dollars, depending on the complexity of the project, and is applied to the cost of the final piece.

After our meeting, I will make an initial drawing and sometimes a scale model of my proposal. I find scale models helpful when a drawing can’t get across what a small detail will look like or if the three dimensional shape of a piece is hard to translate from a simple drawing. We may refine our ideas with a few drawings. On larger or more complex pieces, I may build a full size mockup of the project. This gives me a chance to work with the proportions of a piece and imagine how different elements relate to each other. In the case of a chair, for instance, a mockup can tell us if a chair that looks good as a drawing also fulfills its most important function: is it comfortable? A mockup can also give us an idea of what a finished piece will look like in your home.
After we have finalized the design and picked a suitable wood and finish, I will give you a bid for the cost of the project. This may include the cost of crating, shipping/ delivery, and any special installation that may be required.
I usually request that a deposit of 50% be paid to begin construction.
As I am building a piece of furniture, my goal is to stay open to the possibilities that always present themselves as I am working. When choosing wood for a piece, the actual tone of the wood may call for a doorframe to be a little lighter in weight. The grain pattern may want a different curve: not a radical change, just a response to the material.
I encourage clients to make an appointment to visit the shop during construction, if possible. I enjoy explaining the process and giving you/clients [choose one] an opportunity to see joinery and other details that may be invisible in the finished piece.
At the time of delivery, I ask clients to pay their balance, unless prior arrangements have been made. I am happy to work out a payment plan on larger projects.
After the commission is complete, I will provide you with a booklet documenting the process. Sometimes I am able to photograph from very early in the construction the falling of the tree or picking the lumber from the sawyer all the way to the delivery. The pieces I build are meant to be heirlooms, and the process of making and acquiring them should be a source of pride and an experience to share with others.

I serve those who desire the refinement and attention to detail not available in production furniture, but realized by the hand of an artist.

- Jason Straw, Worker In Wood

  


Process

Solid Wood Vs. Veneer:

There are two main styles of furniture construction: solid wood and veneer. Of course solid means solid, and its aesthetic is comforting; knowing that your furniture is solid oak, afzelia, or walnut is a source of pride. Solid wood also acts like solid wood in that it moves according to changes in the air’s humidity. In Florida, a solid wood dining room table top could easily move 1/2” from summer to winter. This means that a solid wood piece should be designed properly so that the table will not literally work itself apart over the years. There are other ways to work around wood movement; the main technique that I prefer is using veneer.

Many people today rightfully cringe when they hear the word veneer in reference to furniture. The tradition of veneering was hijacked to make cheap furniture that anyone can afford to throw away. Commercial veneer is currently 1/48th” to 1/64th” thick and keeps getting thinner. Amazing, right? Typically, logs are steamed for days until they can slice the veneer off with a razor. This takes an enormous amount of energy, and it discolors the wood from other planks in the species, which makes it very difficult to match commercial veneer with solid wood legs and so on. I would like to introduce my clients and students to the European tradition (veneering dates back to the Egyptians) of sawing veneer from a plank of wood. Using this technique, veneer can be made to an appropriate thickness of approximately 1/16th so that it works like real wood, has the color of other related solid wood such as legs and stretchers, and can be repaired and refinished many times. Sawn veneer at this thickness is not able to overpower the adhesive, and so by cross bonding (how plywood is made), we can arrest its movement and allow for great exploration in design, whether by marquetry or parquetry. In the website’s gallery, you will see many of my custom furniture pieces where the grain is going in every which way; that is veneer at work. Besides liberating the design, working with veneer also allows a solid wood plank of sometimes extremely valuable and one of a kind wood to be stretched up to 6 times per inch of its surface area. I’d also like to note that I am happy to build pieces completely out of solid wood, which is often faster and easier; however, solid wood construction does not offer the creative flexibility and the wood movement stability of shop-sawn veneer. Substrates:

I am proud to offer FSC (Forest Stewardship Certification) formaldehyde-free, soy-based glue Made In The USA commercial veneer core plywood and traditional custom shop made lumber-core substrates.

This should be a list:

I am proud to offer high-quality lumber-core substrates:

· Forest Stewardship Certified
· Formaldehyde-free
· Soy-based
· Made in the U.S.A.
·

Custom Mill Work Services:

Wether you are a fellow woodworker, contractor, or someone just trying to build a shelf for their home, if you need wood milled to any custom specification, call me. There is nothing too extraordinary or too ordinary for me to talk to you about.

  


Artist Bio

I am a custom fine furniture and kitchen cabinet maker in Gainesville, Florida. We can custom make contemporary, mid century modern influenced to traditional shaker style wood work. I design, build, deliver and install one of a kind excellent quality woodwork. After years of specializing in historic home remodeling, I found myself becoming interested in more sensitive work. In my pursuits, I was able to apprentice with an art deco furniture designer and builder, Jeff Newell, in Denver, CO. Then, I was accepted into the Fine Woodworking program at the College of the Redwoods, the school James Krenov founded. I spent two very intense years, including multiple workshops, shows, and competitions, working for Brian Newell and having a remarkable time. Now, I am back in Florida, working with the sensitive eyes and hands of a furniture maker.

-jason

  


Cabinet Construction

Cabinet Construction
Cabinets are constructed using Columbia Forest Products PureBond® plywood and substrates. This product line is made in the USA with no added formaldehyde soy based glues and using Forest Stewardship Councils certified poplar core and a choice of decorative veneer. We are a certified member of C.F.P.’s fabricator network. Cabinet boxes and shelves are made with 0 VOC epoxy acrylate pre-finished maple plywood, all edges are covered with maple veneer banding. The veneer edge banding uses formaldehyde free adhesive and is manufactured in Indiana. Shelf holes are drilled in 7 1/2”, 9”, and 10 1/2” increments, standard 3 shelves per upper box, one shelf per lower box. On the exterior, the cabinet sides that are seen will be covered with end panels that match the finish, profile and species of the doors. Most walls are out of plumb (level) to some degree and often have humps in them. The end panels are originally over sized and are fit/ cut down to accept the inconsistencies so no other trim is needed.
We install the cabinets 2” from the ceiling to leave space for a small crown panel that is fitted like the end panel, to the ceiling which usually has it’s own inconsistencies in being straight or level. The crown panels are cut in sequence with the upper cabinet doors, the grain of the wood matches and follows from the door though the crown panel to the ceiling.
Standard depths:
Lowers/base cabinets: 23” total box depth (22 3/4” box plus 1/4” back) plus door and reveal, 23 7/8”.
Upper/hanging cabinets: 11 1/2” total deep box (11” box plus 1/2” back) plus door and reveal, 12 1/2”.
There are no standard widths, all boxes are custom.

Standard doors are made from either Birch or Maple veneered plywood and have a 1/8” round over on their front edge. All edges are exposed poplar core plywood. Poplar is a very light colored wood and matches birch and maple nicely. The edges are finished with same resin as the doors and are very smooth to the touch. The only time you see the edges are when the doors are open and what is exposed is to many very aesthetically agreeable and because of it’s quality a source of pride. All end panel edges that are exposed are covered in solid wood edge banding of matching species.
Solid wood edge banding is a nice upgrade. This is a necessity when a species other than maple or birch are used. We cut our edge banding out of solid wood at approximately 3/16” thickness, each strip is glued and clamped on, trimmed flush and then a 1/8” round over is run on all fronts. We can also glue solid wood edge banding on all cabinet boxes and shelves.

Frame and Panel doors and drawer fronts can be made with any species available. I have a wonderful stock of Black Walnut and River Recovered Cypress. Our frame and panels doors are constructed with straight grain quarter sawn frames and flat sawn panels. We pay special attention to the figure and graphic of the wood. Our solid wood work is a composition rarely seen even in magazines.

Water based finish process: All doors and end panels are sanded to 180 grit, sealed with finish, sanded with 320 grit, a second application of finish, a final sand of 320 grit, and then the final application of finish. The product we use is a domestic low VOC industrial quality water based product. The resins are predominately acrylic with some polyurethane. Standard finish sheen is satin.
Hand rubbed Oil: We use Osmo Poly-x exterior grade oil for our hand rubbed Projects. We sand 180 grit apply oil, sand again 320 grit apply second coat of oil
LED lighting can be installed under the upper cabinets. The valance which hides the low voltage water-proof light strip is made of solid maple and is 3/4” tall. The cabinet doors when closed cover the valance. You only see the small maple strip when the doors are open.
Waste and Recycle bin configuration is made in the USA. Solid Maple drawer box with Blum under mount slides. Two white waste baskets.
Minimum width box 17 3/4” for double cans or 11 7/8 for single can.
Lazy Susan’s are made in the USA by Rev-A-Shelf. We use a two shelf white solid plastic “Premiere” version. They have acrylic rollers and are self indexing so they stop spinning at the right spot. (Model 6472)
Hardware is manufactured by Blum the leader in drawer roller and hinge technology. The Blum drawer slides are manufactured in North Carolina, the hinges are manufactured in Austria. All cabinet doors will be soft closing, the soft close mechanism is built discreetly into the hinge. All drawer hardware is Tandem® plus Blumotion®, under-mount soft close slides 110 lb static capacity.
Drawer boxes are made in Pennsylvania constructed of 1/2” thick solid maple sides and a 3/8” thick plywood panel bottom. The boxes have 1/16” round over on the top edges and are finished nicely. The dovetail joinery and the hidden drawer slide hardware is a nice touch of refinement. The standard drawer boxes have 3 graduated drawers. The top drawer box is always 4”, the middle drawer box is 6” deep and the lowest drawer box is 8” deep. I have loosely taken the proportion from the golden mean ratio of 60%.

  


JASON STRAW CUSTOM FURNITURE AND CABINETS | 518 NW 2ND STREET, GAINESVILLE, FL 32601 | Phone: (352) 371-3571  Join